?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Latin

Vivite et Vivito

"Vivite et Vivito"
"Vivite and Vivito"

I found this:

Innocue vivite: numen adest

The person says:

The phrase "innocue vivite: numen adest" comes from the Ars Amatoria (i.e. the Art of Love) a poem in three books written by the Romen poet Ovid (43 BC - 17 AD). Apparently, the poem was about how to find a guy/girl and how to hold onto him/her (sounds kind of like The Rules huh?).

Anyway, the phrase loosely translate to "live harmlessly: the spirit is at hand." The Swedish naturalist Carolus Linnaeus (1707-1778), the guy who invented the system of binomial nomenclature, had it enscribed on the lintel over the bedroom doorway in his summer home (Hammarby) outside of Uppsala. The quote was actually mistakenly written as "innocue vivito."

It's quoted incorrectly, but it's still meaningful Latin.

Innocue vivite: numen adest -- live harmlessly: the spirit is at hand [said to more than one person]

Innocue vivito: numen adest -- live harmlessly: the spirit is at hand [said with emphasis to one person]

The vivito is the future imperative.
Tags:

Comments

Sailor Saturn/Hotaru Tomoe

November 2013

S M T W T F S
     12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Tags

Powered by LiveJournal.com